Hunt School of Nursing Faculty Highlight: Luisa A. Bowcutt, M.S.N., APRN, CNM

Hunt School of Nursing Faculty Highlight: Luisa A. Bowcutt, M.S.N., APRN, CNM

Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso is celebrating the Hunt School of Nursing’s 10-year anniversary in 2021. TTUHSC El Paso invites the community to participate in a year-long effort to celebrate the work of nurses and highlight the challenging conditions they often face in the workforce. In celebration, we invite you to get to know some of our Hunt School of Nursing faculty who are shaping the future of health care for the Borderland. They are dedicated to excellence and committed to care. 

This month’s highlight features Luisa A. Bowcutt, M.S.N., APRN, CNM, instructor for the Hunt School of Nursing.

Luisa A. Bowcutt, M.S.N., APRN, CNM, instructor for the Hunt School of Nursing, has made the daily journey to the San Juan neighborhood in Central El Paso most of her adult life: as a high school student, young nurse and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso faculty.

A love of nursing found Bowcutt when she was a student at Maxine Silva Health Magnet School.

“In high school, I had the opportunity to shadow nurses at University Medical Center of El Paso, and that’s where I discovered that my passion was in nursing,” she said.

After graduating from Silva in 2001, Bowcutt attended the University of Texas at El Paso, where she received her Bachelor of Science in nursing in 2005.  She spent eight years at UMC as a nurse in labor and delivery.

“I assisted with hundreds of births, and each one was always exciting and fulfilling. One experience changed my life and career. On an especially busy day, I had the unusual opportunity to not just assist, but take the lead in delivering a patient’s baby boy,” said Bowcutt. “I remember the sense of exhilaration and accomplishment I felt. That experience inspired me to further my education and become an advance nurse provider.”

Bowcutt graduated from TTUHSC in Lubbock in 2012 with a Master of Science in nursing with the inaugural certified nurse midwife cohort.

“Today my passion is not only in women’s health but also nursing education,” said Bowcutt.

Originally a clinical instructor, Bowcutt became a full-time instructor at the Hunt School of Nursing in 2019. She acknowledges that nursing school is challenging but essential for creating future health care heroes as Texas faces a shortfall of nearly 16,000 registered nurses by 2030, according to a 2017 projection by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

“Our nursing students have to juggle multiple responsibilities besides their studies. Some of my students are balancing supporting a family and working a full-time job while completing our accelerated nursing program,” said Bowcutt. “One thing for sure is that our students are determined and passionate about nursing. Together we’re all working to help combat the nursing shortage in the Borderland.”