Emergency Medicine Faculty Trains Second Cohort of Mountain View Students

Mountain View High School graduated its second and largest cohort of students from its emergency medical responder (EMR) course this spring. This year’s class, which held its certification ceremony at the end of May, had 21 students compared to last year’s 10.

The course was offered through an affiliation between the Department of Emergency Medicine’s Simulation Education Division at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center El Paso and the Clint Independent School District. TTUHSC El Paso emergency medicine educators taught the course as part of the Health Professions Academy at Mountain View High School.

This year’s course also included Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training.

Twenty-one students completed Mountain View High School’s emergency medical responder course.

Twenty-one students completed Mountain View High School’s emergency medical responder course.

The CERT training educated the students about disaster preparedness for their region and taught basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization and disaster medical operations.

“CERT is a program that has been implemented in high schools across the country,” said CERT coordinator Alex Miranda, a firefighter with the El Paso Fire Department. “It’s a way of making (students) resilient, not just now, but for the future, and teaches them life-changing skills and leadership skills.”

EMR course instructors included faculty from TTUHSC El Paso’s Department of Emergency Medicine.

EMR course instructors included faculty from TTUHSC El Paso’s Department of Emergency Medicine.

The Mountain View students completed more than 150 hours of training to become state and nationally certified as emergency first responders.

Brian Wilson, a Department of Emergency Medicine faculty associate who coordinated the course at Mountain View, addressed the students at their certification ceremony.

“We hope that this sparks your interest in medicine,” he said. “As I’ve told you many times, a lot of our emergency medicine faculty started out right where you started out: as first responders, emergency medical technicians, and now they’re board-certified in emergency medicine. The sky is the limit in regard to where you want to take this core knowledge.”

The course included cognitive and skills training, including pre-hospital emergency medicine. Students learned splinting, bandaging, airway assessment and some medication administration as part of their skills training.

The training schedule included visits to TTUHSC El Paso, where students were put through various emergency medicine scenarios.