Nurses Begin Rotations at Transmountain Campus

In July, nursing students in the Gayle Greve Hunt School of Nursing (GGHSON) began their first clinical rotations at The Hospitals of Providence Transmountain Campus. The group of 10 students began their shifts as part of the school’s Chronic Care in Nursing course.

In July, Gayle Greve Hunt School of Nursing students began their first clinical rotations at The Hospitals of Providence Transmountain Campus.

In July, Gayle Greve Hunt School of Nursing students began their first clinical rotations at The Hospitals of Providence Transmountain Campus.

The course teaches nurses how to provide care to patients with chronic or long-standing illnesses, such as hypertension, diabetes, heart failure, or obstructive pulmonary disease. For nurses in a hospital setting, these patients are often admitted for an acute illness in addition to a chronic illness.

“As the first nursing class at the Transmountain Campus, our students have had a great opportunity to see the many aspects of patient care,” said GGHSON course instructor Joshua Romero, M.S.N., APRN, FNP. “Although the ultimate goal of this class is to manage chronic conditions, this hospital has allowed our nurses to see the acute side of these diseases — which can better prepare them for when they are practicing on their own.”

During the rotation, each nursing student is paired with a registered nurse (R.N.) at the Transmountain Campus. The R.N. shows the student the ropes and monitors their work as they assume total patient care. That includes intravenous initiation and discontinuation, Foley catheter insertion, wound care dressing, and administration of medications.

The students spent a total of 10 days at the hospital throughout the summer course. After each rotation, Romero and his class would rehash the day, reviewing what the students did well and what could have gone better.

Thus far, the nurses have had the chance to work in the hospital’s intensive care unit, emergency room, telemetry unit, and preoperative and surgical suites.

Romero said, “I feel that the students had a great experience and I hope that they continue to learn as much as they can in terms of hands-on skills and pathophysiology.”